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Mansion Dining Room

Mansion Dining Room

Offering a choice of venues from intimate to grand, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek’s private dining rooms are suitable for an array of occasions. The Sheppard King Suite, FDR Suite, Burford Room, Pavilion, Hunt Suite, Promenade and Wine Cellar present the ultimate in residential-style venues complemented by the Mansion’s award-winning cuisine and impeccable service. To create a memorable occasion, The Mansion’s team assists in planning each dining experience and arranging customized culinary creations. Tailored menus may include wine pairings by the Mansion’s renowned sommelier.
mansion dining room 1

Mansion Dining Room

Private DiningOffering a choice of venues from intimate to grand, Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek’s private dining rooms are suitable for an array of occasions. The Sheppard King Suite, FDR Suite, Burford Room, Pavilion, Hunt Suite, Promenade and Wine Cellar present the ultimate in residential-style venues complemented by the Mansion’s award-winning cuisine and impeccable service. To create a memorable occasion, The Mansion’s team assists in planning each dining experience and arranging customized culinary creations. Tailored menus may include wine pairings by the Mansion’s renowned sommelier.
mansion dining room 2

Mansion Dining Room

aThe New Room Photo by Gavin Ashworth Photo by Gavin Ashworth Photo by Gavin Ashworth 22′ 9″ wide x 30′ 6″ long x 16′ 6″ high Washington called this room—the last addition to the Mansion and the grandest space in the house—his “New Room.” With its two-story-high ceiling, detailed architectural ornament, and stylish furnishings, the New Room was intended to emphasize unpretentious beauty and fine craftsmanship, qualities he believed communicated the new nation’s values. Washington summed up his ambitious goals for the room in a letter written while he was off fighting the Revolutionary War: “I would have the whole executed in a masterly manner.” Opting for vivid paint and wallpaper through much of the house, Washington made choices that expressed the tastes of his era, when the use of bold colors was a sign of wealth. The stunning green of the wallpaper in this room was one of his favorites. The furnishings include various original Washington pieces as well as period pieces similiar to those the Washingtons would have owned. Washington ordered the Federal-style sideboard (on the river side of the room) and several of the side chairs from Philadelphia cabinetmaker John Aitken near the end of his presidency. Like the grand “salons” of fashionable 18th-century English manor homes, this room was meant to serve several functions. As a receiving area for visitors, its high ceiling, large volume, and symmetrical decoration made the space truly impressive as the room alone was larger than most houses in colonial Virginia. As well as its scale, the New Room’s large north-facing window made it an ideal picture-gallery. Washington hung 21 works of art in the room; the six large landscape paintings currently on display are the original canvases that Washington acquired. Finally, the room was used occasionally for dining, likely for guests of high rank or large parties that could not be accommodated in the smaller dining room. The New Room’s high ceilings and two exterior doors also provided much-needed cross-ventilation when the Washingtons entertained during the warm summer months. Learn More About the New Room Restoration
mansion dining room 3

Mansion Dining Room

22′ 9″ wide x 30′ 6″ long x 16′ 6″ high Washington called this room—the last addition to the Mansion and the grandest space in the house—his “New Room.” With its two-story-high ceiling, detailed architectural ornament, and stylish furnishings, the New Room was intended to emphasize unpretentious beauty and fine craftsmanship, qualities he believed communicated the new nation’s values. Washington summed up his ambitious goals for the room in a letter written while he was off fighting the Revolutionary War: “I would have the whole executed in a masterly manner.” Opting for vivid paint and wallpaper through much of the house, Washington made choices that expressed the tastes of his era, when the use of bold colors was a sign of wealth. The stunning green of the wallpaper in this room was one of his favorites. The furnishings include various original Washington pieces as well as period pieces similiar to those the Washingtons would have owned. Washington ordered the Federal-style sideboard (on the river side of the room) and several of the side chairs from Philadelphia cabinetmaker John Aitken near the end of his presidency. Like the grand “salons” of fashionable 18th-century English manor homes, this room was meant to serve several functions. As a receiving area for visitors, its high ceiling, large volume, and symmetrical decoration made the space truly impressive as the room alone was larger than most houses in colonial Virginia. As well as its scale, the New Room’s large north-facing window made it an ideal picture-gallery. Washington hung 21 works of art in the room; the six large landscape paintings currently on display are the original canvases that Washington acquired. Finally, the room was used occasionally for dining, likely for guests of high rank or large parties that could not be accommodated in the smaller dining room. The New Room’s high ceilings and two exterior doors also provided much-needed cross-ventilation when the Washingtons entertained during the warm summer months. Learn More About the New Room Restoration
mansion dining room 4

Mansion Dining Room

This room is used regularly for dinners, luncheons, and breakfasts.  We can seat 18 people at the table, and 50 people with four round tables at the corners of the room. The table is mahogany and is called an Accordion Table.  It was made by John Seymour in Boston (Circa 1810).  It is 14 feet long and can be cut down to seat four people. The chairs are Curly Maple English reproductions of the Federal Greek Revival style.  They are exact replicas of the 19th Century chairs that are in the Telfair Academy in Savannah. The candelabras and the Epergne on the table came from the battleship “Georgia” and were made at the turn of the century.  They are Gorham Silver. The cut glass covered compote is Waterford and is etched with the Georgia State Seal.  Rich’s Department Store gave this piece to the Mansion for the 250th Anniversary of the State of Georgia (1733-1983).  Above the chest in the State Dining Room is an oil painting that is signed and dated by Benjamin West .  It is called “The Preparation of Psyche,” or “The Stolen Kiss.”  In the early sixties, this painting was in the Montreal Museum of Art in Canada. All of the fabrics in the State Dining Room are by Scalamandre, as are the majority of the fabrics throughout the rest of the Mansion. ‹ State Drawing Room up Circular Hall › Print thisPDF version
mansion dining room 5

Mansion Dining Room

This room is used regularly for dinners, luncheons, and breakfasts.  We can seat 18 people at the table, and 50 people with four round tables at the corners of the room. The table is mahogany and is called an Accordion Table.  It was made by John Seymour in Boston (Circa 1810).  It is 14 feet long and can be cut down to seat four people. The chairs are Curly Maple English reproductions of the Federal Greek Revival style.  They are exact replicas of the 19th Century chairs that are in the Telfair Academy in Savannah. The candelabras and the Epergne on the table came from the battleship “Georgia” and were made at the turn of the century.  They are Gorham Silver. The cut glass covered compote is Waterford and is etched with the Georgia State Seal.  Rich’s Department Store gave this piece to the Mansion for the 250th Anniversary of the State of Georgia (1733-1983).  Above the chest in the State Dining Room is an oil painting that is signed and dated by Benjamin West .  It is called “The Preparation of Psyche,” or “The Stolen Kiss.”  In the early sixties, this painting was in the Montreal Museum of Art in Canada. All of the fabrics in the State Dining Room are by Scalamandre, as are the majority of the fabrics throughout the rest of the Mansion. ‹ State Drawing Room up Circular Hall ›
mansion dining room 6

Mansion Dining Room

This room is used regularly for dinners, luncheons, and breakfasts.  We can seat 18 people at the table, and 50 people with four round tables at the corners of the room. The table is mahogany and is called an Accordion Table.  It was made by John Seymour in Boston (Circa 1810).  It is 14 feet long and can be cut down to seat four people. The chairs are Curly Maple English reproductions of the Federal Greek Revival style.  They are exact replicas of the 19th Century chairs that are in the Telfair Academy in Savannah. The candelabras and the Epergne on the table came from the battleship “Georgia” and were made at the turn of the century.  They are Gorham Silver. The cut glass covered compote is Waterford and is etched with the Georgia State Seal.  Rich’s Department Store gave this piece to the Mansion for the 250th Anniversary of the State of Georgia (1733-1983).  Above the chest in the State Dining Room is an oil painting that is signed and dated by Benjamin West .  It is called “The Preparation of Psyche,” or “The Stolen Kiss.”  In the early sixties, this painting was in the Montreal Museum of Art in Canada. All of the fabrics in the State Dining Room are by Scalamandre, as are the majority of the fabrics throughout the rest of the Mansion.

Mansion Dining Room

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